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Thursday, November 19, 2020

Notes on the Apocalypse of John (Second Teaching of Metropolitan Athanasios of Limassol)

 
 
Below are summary notes I took while listening to the lecture below of Metropolitan Athanasios of Limassol. This is the second of 19 video lectures on the Book of Revelation, also known as the Apocalypse.
 
- When we study the Apocalypse of John, we do not study it to see the events of the present time, or to learn when this or that will take place.

- The Apocalypse of John is written to help bring us closer to God and to give us the blessed hope and assurance that God will be victorious in the end, and those people who have hope and patience will live with God for eternity.
 

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Notes on the Apocalypse of John (First Teaching of Metropolitan Athanasios of Limassol)

 
Below are summary notes I took while listening to the lecture below of Metropolitan Athanasios of Limassol. This is the first of 19 video lectures on the Book of Revelation, also known as the Apocalypse.
 
- The Apocalypse of John is the last book of the 27 books of the New Testament.

- It is the last book of the New Testament chronologically as well, written by the Apostle and Evangelist John the Theologian while he was in exile on the island of Patmos.

- It is a prophetic text of things that were taking place in the Church at the time and that were to take place in the future.

- We should know the contents of this book to understand that we are all on a journey that is leading towards a conclusion.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Hell is the Grace of God (St. Gabriel the Confessor)

 
By St. Gabriel the Confessor of Georgia
 
The Lord does not leave a person, a person leaves God.

God has done no evil, because evil has no substance.

Evil is a lack of good.

Satan was a bearer of light, created with goodness, but then, when he deprived himself of the good, he changed into evil.

Monday, August 31, 2020

Concerns About Prophecies and the Coronavirus


By Father Andreas Agathokleous

It is good to sometimes put ourselves in the shoes of people who do not attend Catechetical and Religious discourses, nor go frequently to ecclesiastical Services, without, however, being considered atheists. They simply stay a little away from "ecclesiastical events", with a bit of skepticism and substantial concern.

These people, listening and reading, through social media, about prophecies, about the relationship between the coronavirus and God's grace, about the demonization of the forthcoming vaccine, and a lot of other "abouts", what do they have to say?

Friday, August 28, 2020

Concerning the Alleged End-Time Prophecy of Abba Moses the Ethiopian


As with many alleged end-time prophecies distributed in Orthodox Christian literature, what is known of the origins of the "Prophecy of Abba Moses the Ethiopian" is almost impossible to determine. You can come across its title in a catalogue of Athonite manuscripts from 1895, where a manuscript is found at Philotheou Monastery in a translation into simpler Greek. The first time this prophecy is published, it appears in the Athonite periodical Αγιορειτική Βιβλιοθήκη (ετ. Ε΄, 1940-41, αρ. 50-51, Νοέμβριος-Δεκέμβριος 1940, σ. 108) in the November-December 1940 issue (pictured below). There it says that it came from a manuscript of a cell of the Great Lavra Monastery, specifically the Cell of Symeon the God-Receiver of Elder Benjamin the Monk. As far as I can tell, this manuscript is never mentioned anywhere before this time.